This lower part of The Gully, which was once the living quarters of landlords and workers in the area, is where people claim to feel most uncomfortable. Some long serving staff members refuse to go in certain areas such as the glass room because it makes them feel so uneasy.

Over the years staff at The Gully have reported their name being called out during lock-up at night time, and also smelling the odour of fairy floss or blossoms in areas that usually smell terrible. It’s not out of the ordinary for machines and other electrical devices such as televisions to turn themselves on or off, and there have been cases of unexplained banging noises, or glasses falling off the bar by themselves.

Staff members who’ve had unusual encounters don’t believe that our Gully ghost is a bad one. Over the years sightings have included a girl dressed in a white dress (not modern style) lying on the toilet floor, and the sound of happy laughter coming from under the walkway bridge.

There are two confirmed deaths associated with The Gully from the 19th century; One of these was Mr Joseph Morris, the landlord of the hotel in 1899. Joseph had been driving himself and several women when one of the horses became unmanageable. Sadly Joseph was thrown “with fearful force” and died in the accident.

The second death involved an infant that is believed to have been suffocated at the hotel by its mother who was staying overnight in a room. However she was not convicted as there was a question mark over her guilt.

Despite rumours to the contrary, there is no record of anybody having hanged themselves in the hotel.


*A big thank you to the Tea Tree Gully Library, the State Library, the Tea Tree Gully Historical Society, the Old Highercombe Hotel Museum, and the Paranormal Field Investigators for helping compile this information and supplying photographs.